Eight Funeral Songs WoO VI/15

for mixed voice unaccompanied choir

Content
  • No. 1 [O wie selig seid ihr doch…]

    Text: Simon Dach

  • No. 2 [Nimm den entseelten Leib…]

    Text: Heinrich Julius Tode (Verse 1, 3)Christian Friedrich Heinrich Sachse (Verse 2)

  • No. 3 [Nun bringen wir den Leib zur Ruh…]

    Text: Ehrenfried Liebich (Verse 1)

  • No. 4 [Die Hoffnung auf ein bessres Leben…]

    Text: unknown

  • No. 5 [Hier, Mensch, hier lerne, was du bist…]

    Text: unknown

  • No. 6 [Weinet nicht! Nur des Leibes…]

    Text: unknown

  • No. 7 [Verzaget nicht, es lebt ein Gott…]

    Text: unknown

  • No. 8 [Menschenkind, Menschenkind…]

    Text: unknown

Creation
Komponiert vermutlich in München, Spätjahr 1901
Status
Dedication

Performance medium
Mixed choir [Soprano, Alto, Tenor, Bass]

Work collection
  • -
Original work
  • -
Versions
  • -

1.

Reger-Werkausgabe Bd. II/8: Werke für gemischten Chor a cappella I, S. 160–163.
Herausgeber Alexander Becker, Christopher Grafschmidt, Stefan König, Stefanie Steiner-Grage.
Verlag Carus-Verlag, Stuttgart; Verlagsnummer: CV 52.815.
Erscheinungsdatum Juni 2018.
Notensatz Carus-Verlag, Stuttgart.
Copyright 2018 by Carus-Verlag, Stuttgart and Max-Reger-Institut, Karlsruhe – CV 52.815.
Vervielfältigungen jeglicher Art sind gesetzlich verboten. / Any unauthorized reproduction is prohibited by law.
Alle Rechte vorbehalten. / All rights reserved.
ISMN M-007-18831-3.
ISBN 978-3-89948-302-4.

No. 1


Category
Text template
First edition
unknown

Template edition

Copy shown in RWA: DE, Karlsruhe, Max-Reger-Institut/Elsa-Reger-Stiftung.


Annotations

Note: Gedichtet auf den Tod Hiob Lepners (6. Mai 1635), Vizebürgermeister von Königsberg. Erschienen in der bei Lepners Begräbnis aufgeführten Vertonung durch Johannes Stobaeus (1580–1646). (Siehe DFG-Projekt “Gelegenheitsmusik des Ostseeraums vom 16. bis 18. Jahrhundert” (www.gelegenheitsmusik-ostseeraum.de).)


No. 2


Category
Text template
First edition

Template edition

Used for comparison purposes in RWA: First edition

Copy shown in RWA: DE, München, Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, Liturg. 1212 l.


Annotations

Category
Text template
First edition

Template edition

Used for comparison purposes in RWA: First edition

Copy shown in RWA: DE, München, Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, Liturg. 678 d.


Annotations

No. 3


Category
Text template
First edition
unknown

Template edition

Copy shown in RWA: DE, Karlsruhe, Max-Reger-Institut/Elsa-Reger-Stiftung.


Annotations

No. 4


Category
Text template
First edition
unknown

Template edition

Annotations

No. 5


Werk
Category
Text template
First edition

Template edition

Used for comparison purposes in RWA: First edition

Copy shown in RWA: DE, Freiburg, Universitätsbibliothek, TM 2018/897-1.


Annotations

No. 6


Category
Text template
First edition

Template edition

Used for comparison purposes in RWA: Am Grabe eines Jünglings, in: Das Rütli. Ein Liederbuch für Männergesang, 33rd edition, J. J. Sonderegger, St. Gallen 1899, p. 98–99.

Copy shown in RWA: DE, Karlsruhe, Max-Reger-Institut/Elsa-Reger-Stiftung.


Annotations

Note: Erschienen in einer Vertonung von wahrscheinlich Carl Gottlieb Elsässer (zumeist wird als Komponist Ernst G. Elsässer (geb. 1880) angegeben).


No. 7


Category
Text template
First edition

Template edition

Used for comparison purposes in RWA: First edition

Copy shown in RWA: DE, Karlsruhe, Max-Reger-Institut/Elsa-Reger-Stiftung.


Annotations

Note: Im Gesangbuch Adressat in der jeweils 1. Strophenhälfte im Singular (“Verzage nicht” usw.).


No. 8


Category
Text template
First edition
unknown

Template edition

Annotations

1. Composition and Publication

Nothing is known about the composition of the Eight Funeral songs; they were mentioned for the first time at the end of the 1920s when the publisher Breitkopf & Härtel explored the idea of a collection of posthumous works by Reger with a view to publication. In the process the publisher evidently made contact with Reger’s sister Emma via his widow. In her possession there were also three “youthful songs” WoO VII/10–12 as well as the Funeral Songs which she initially handed over to her sister-in-law. After Joseph Haas had looked through the works, the publisher asked Elsa Reger on 31 December 1929 to send them quickly, “so that a decision can be reached straight away” (letter). This evidently turned out to be a positive one, so that the publishing director Hellmuth von Hase agreed “that we will acquire the 3 Songs and 8 Funeral songs for RM 500.” (Letter) As a result Emma assigned her rights to the publisher (vgl. letter from Breitkopf & Härtel dated 11 June 1930 to Elsa Reger).

The publisher received copies made by Emma Reger both of the “youthful songs” and the Funeral Songs (see WoO VII/1–13 – Quellenüberlieferung). The note “hs.” [“ms.”] (as opposed to “gedr.” [“printed”]) in the publisher’s inventory1 cannot therefore be interpreted as a reference to Reger’s autograph manuscript, but might simply relate to the copy. The date “1900” is also found in the inventory. There is no clue as to the date when the Funeral Songs copy was made, and the whereabouts of the manuscript remains a mystery.

The two colors used in the copy at least proves a composition date after summer 1892 (see Regers Verwendung von roter Tinte). It also shows that the two-color original manuscript served as a source, and must therefore have been in Emma Reger’s possession. As Reger gave the rejected autograph manuscripts which still existed to his close friend Adalbert Lindner when he moved from Weiden at the beginning of September 1901, and the Funeral Songs are not mentioned by Lindner anywhere, it can be assumed that they were only composed in Munich. Here it seems plausible that they were written around the same time as the Mourning Songs (Dirges) which ended Opus 61, which were written between July and November 1901. As Reger explicitly asked the publisher Richard Linnemann (C.F.W. Siegel’s Musikalienhandlung) “to leave space for additions” (see Opus 61 – Publication) on the title page of the Leicht ausführbare Kompositionen zum gottesdienstlichen Gebrauche, it is at any rate conceivable that the Funeral Songs were intended as a continuation. The manuscript probably remained in the possession of the family after Reger’s marriage and his move from the shared apartment in October 1902, from whence it may have ended up with Emma following their mother’s death in June 1911.

The publication of works from Reger’s estate by Breitkopf & Härtel was at any rate first tackled in the 1943 anniversary year. An order for the Funeral Songs to be engraved was also placed, but the printing was cancelled for unknown reasons. It is conceivable that, despite Joseph Haas’s approval, there was a new, negative report, as with the “youthful songs” WoO VII/3, 4, 6, 7, 14 (see Quellenüberlieferung und Editionsgeschichte).

2.

Translation by Elizabeth Robinson.


1
Sächsisches Staatsarchiv Leipzig, Findbuch (1991), Vol. I (1818–1945), p. 177, no. 6572.

1. Reception

At present, there are no records of performances in Reger's time.

1. Stemma

Die in Klammern gesetzten Quellen sind verschollen.
Die in Klammern gesetzten Quellen sind verschollen.

2. Quellenbewertung

Der Edition liegt als Leitquelle die Abschrift Emma Regers zugrunde.

3. Sources

  • Abschriftliche Partitur von Emma Reger (geplante Stichvorlage)
Object reference

Max Reger: Eight Funeral Songs WoO VI/15, in: Reger-Werkausgabe, www.reger-werkausgabe.de/mri_work_01038.html, last check: 16th June 2024.

Information

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